Alcohol Dependency: Who Are The Real Victims?

Many people often sympathize with, or furious with, alcoholics. Nowadays, they are starting to understand that individuals around the problem drinkers are also broken by their actions.

Alcoholism strikes at everybody around the alcoholic. Wives, husbands, partners; children, mothers, fathers; friends; and even random strangers who were just “in the wrong place” at the time.

Almost always, it is not the intention of the alcoholic to cause problems. The person addicted to alcohol often has feelings of despair, fear, self-loathing and helplessness. Sadly, they become wrapped up in their own misery and fail to notice the effects that they have on other people. Because of their dreadful introspection, alcoholics then enter a downward spiral, where they drink to forget or to cope with their unpleasant feelings, and the alcohol simply makes those feelings worse.

Eventually, the alcoholic believes himself or herself unable to cope without drinking.

Because of the addling effects that alcohol has on the brain, the alcoholic will start to blame circumstances and other people for his or her problems. It becomes a case of believing, “I’m not an alcoholic.

In order to learn how to stop drinking alcohol, the person will need plenty of support, from loved ones and friends, professional organizations, and therapists. None of this will help if the alcoholic has not first admitted without reservation to the problem.

Each time you help, it becomes another excuse for the alcoholic. Many alcoholics admit their problems only after they have lost everything that is dear to them: Family, children, friends, job, house …

Once the alcoholic has admitted to the problem and agrees to seek help, then is the time to support. The alcoholic needs tools to learn how to stop drinking alcohol.

The important thing to remember is that alcohol is a highly addictive drug, and so alcohol addiction (usually) needs more than one approach. Mixing together as many different approaches as possible, all working together, will give the greatest chance of success.

Once the alcoholic has admitted to the problem and agrees to seek help, then is the time to support. The alcoholic needs tools to learn how to stop drinking alcohol.